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  • brominated flame retardants

    brominated flame retardants

    Although the U.S. and the EU banned the manufacturing of certain types of PBDEs (polybrominated diphenylethers) by 2004, Britain's progress on the regulation front is much slower and PBDEs have yet to be completely phased out.   PBDEs have gained a prominent place in the hierarchy of most toxic... read more

    Sep 12,2020 News
  • fabric become fire retardant

    fabric become fire retardant

    There are three main ways that a fabric may become fire retardant (FR):   First,  the fabric may itself consist of, and be woven from, yarns which are inherently fire retardant e.g. wool. This is the best solution as the drape and natural feel of the fabric is unaffected.   Second, and mos... read more

    Sep 12,2020 News
  • Considerations Around Fabric Flammability

    Considerations Around Fabric Flammability

    Considerations Around Fabric Flammability Fabric flammability is an important issue to consider, especially for drapery that will be used in a public space such as a school, theatre or special event venue, since federal regulations require that drapery fabrics used in such spaces be certified as fir... read more

    Sep 12,2020 News
  • FLAME RETARDANTS ON UPHOLSTERY

    FLAME RETARDANTS ON UPHOLSTERY

    FLAME RETARDANTS ON UPHOLSTERY Hidden Danger The most common use of flame retardants on residential upholstered furnishings is found inside down-filled cushions. The cotton fabric, or “ticking,” encasing the down is treated with a flame retardant. Unfortunately, many of these chemicals are hydrophil... read more

    Sep 12,2020 News
  • Flame-retardant chemistry

    Flame-retardant chemistry

    Residential, upholstered furniture is flammable. It can be both a starting point for fires and a substantial source of fuel for fires that originate elsewhere in the home.     In the case of flame-retardant chemicals, the transfer is almost inevitable. The variable is the amount of flame retard... read more

    Sep 12,2020 News